Frequently Asked Questions

Q)What are some differences between ICE SOCCER and Field Soccer?

A)Like traditional soccer, the basic objective of ICE SOCCER is to score points by kicking a projectile into the opponent's goal area. For adult games, each side (team) has nine players: six slammer/blockers, two backs, and a goal keeper. An extra back is added in youth games, for a total of ten players per side. Games are typically 30–60 minutes long.

As in soccer, there are similar restrictions regulating the use of the hands and arms, but unlike its cousin played on grass, ICE SOCCER doesn't permit heading or slide tackles. The offside rules are also very different from those used in soccer or ice hockey.

Q)Is ICE SOCCER exciting?

A) The thrills and spills that the ice surface provides, the close–up action, the fast pace of the game, the scoring and the enthusiastic screaming of players looking for a pass rule out any monotony. Try sitting in the stands and not getting involved in both the action and the laughs this sport provides. You can't be a demure, passive observer!

Q)Is it all about finesse and nuance?

A)Are you kidding!?! When you're slipping and sliding on ice, trying to position and pass a three pound BOOT'R, while your opponents are trying to steal it from you, you expect finesse? Sorry! You just get excitement and fun.

Q)Does ICE SOCCER have a lot of offense?

A)Does Mike Tyson have a K.O. punch? This sport has lots of break–away rushes, steals, stretch passes, and that all–but–guarantee you'll never see a 0–0 tie!

Q)Why doesn't ICE SOCCER use a regular ball?

A)On ice, soccer balls travel faster and farther than on grass, while players run much slower. This difference causes too many interruptions in the flow of the game. The BOOT'R was specifically designed to travel at a speed that sustains the flow of the game.

A different kicking motion is required when playing on ice. which makes it more difficult to control soccer balls. The BOOT'R has a large sweet spot, making it easier to control.

Ice rinks are smaller than soccer fields, and soccer balls are too lively for the smaller area and would too easily be kicked into the stands. Chasing down balls, especially outdoors, is too disruptive to the game. Again, The BOOT'R solves this problem.

Q)What about falling?

A)Because it's played on ice, there is obviously some risk when playing ICE SOCCER. Risk is inherent in every sport. To mitigate the risk, ICE SOCCER rules require appropriate protective gear, and prescribe penalties for most physical contact. Of course, as players learn to overcome the challenges of playing on ice, they improve their balance, coordination, and anticipation, so they become more proficient at running, passing and scoring.

Q)Am I good enough to play?

A)If you can walk briskly, you can play and enjoy yourself in a casual pick-up game or family outing fun game. If you are in reasonably good shape, you can readily mix it up in organized, competitive play. You do not have to be a proficient, practiced athlete to play and enjoy (unlike a hockey player who has to be a good skater first to then become a hockey player, or a tennis player who must first perfect the serve to be effective in the game).

But there is a lot of room to improve your initial skill level in ICE SOCCER. As you gain confidence on the ice and familiarity with the play of the BOOT'R, you will develop techniques for passing, play making, fast-breaking and scoring when on offense and develop interesting moves when on defense. ICE SOCCER can be played at many different levels. The more you play, the more you will learn and improve.

Q)How can I get ICE SOCCER started in my high school or college?

A)New sports most often have to be asked for by the students. If students do not ask for it, administrators are not likely to offer it. Being such a new sport, interested students should explain ICE SOCCER to the administrators and/or students groups (recreational, club or intramural sports student advisory councils) that make recommendations to the administration. Having a faculty coach lined up will also help, as will telling how required protective gear and footwear will be secured, provided and/or handled. In many cases players will supply their own. Ask the administration if an ICE SOCCER season can be scheduled in those months before or after the high demand ice time of the ice hockey season. If not, ask to schedule ICE SOCCER games after hockey practise or on days when the the local hockey team plays away games. And if ice-time budget is a consideration, perhaps local civic groups or community businesses can be secured as team sponsors to help off-set costs, at least until the sport becomes established in a regular school budget.

Q)My local rink never seems to have any ice time available. What can I do?

A)Sometimes all ice time for months is bulk-purchased by a club, association or league to guarantee ice time for their members. In those rinks that sell their time in bulk, this is usually the case during hockey season. Your rink manager technically has sold this time and for him/her this time is no longer available. You should contact the bulk-purchasing organization to see if they will rent/sub-let desired ice time to you. In other cases some rinks (private and secondary school/college rinks) may trade ice time for municipal services or tax offsets. The rink manager has no control of this traded time. You would have to negotiate time with the municipal authorities.

 
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